WHATSAPP Security flaws could allow snoops to slide into group chats.

When WhatsApp added end-to-end encryption to every conversation for its billion users two years ago, the mobile messaging giant significantly raised the bar for the privacy of digital communications worldw ide. But one of the tricky elements of encryption - and even trickier in a group chat setting - has always been ensuring that a secure conversation reaches only the intended

audience, rather than some impostor or infiltrator.

And according to new research from one team of German cryptographers, flaws in WhatsApp make infiltrating the app's group chats much easier than ought to be possible.

At the Real World Crypto security conference Wednesday in Zurich, Switzerland, a group of researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany plan to describe a series of flaws in encrypted messaging apps including WhatsApp, Signal, and Threema. The team argues their findings undermine each app's security claims for multi-person group conversations to varying degrees.

But while the Signal and Threema flaws they found were relatively harmless, the researchers unearthed far more significant gaps in WhatsApp's security: They say that anyone who controls WhatsApp's servers could effortlessly insert new people into an otherwise private group, even without the permission of the administrator who ostensibly controls access to that conversation.

"The confidentiality of the group is broken as soon as the uninvited member can obtain all the new messages and read them," says Paul Rösler, one of the Ruhr University researchers who co-authored a paper on the group messaging vulnerabilities. "If I hear there's end-to-end encryption for both groups and two-party communications, that means adding of new members should be protected against. And if not, the value of encryption is very little."

That any would-be eavesdropper would have to control the WhatsApp server limits the spying method to sophisticated hackers who could compromise those servers, WhatsApp staffers, or governments who legally coerce WhatsApp to give them access. But the premise of so-called end-to-end encryption has always been that even a compromised server shouldn't expose secrets. Only people in a conversation should be able to read WhatsApp's messages, not the servers themselves.

"If you build a system where everything comes down to trusting the server, you might as well dispense with all the complexity and forget about end-to-end encryption," says Matthew Green, a cryptography professor at Johns Hopkins University who reviewed the Ruhr University researchers' work. "It's just a total screwup. There's no excuse."

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@ WIRED - www.wired.com #WHATSAPP #SECURITY #ENCRYPTION #MESSAGING #SIGNAL

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